Resto File # 7: Vacuum Control Box

 

 

Join me in this video as I dissect one of the strange black vacuum control boxes and find out what makes it tick.

I’ll show you how to test the solenoids found inside and also discuss it’s purpose and effects. This is more of a diagnosis how-to and a lesson than a step in restoration, (It’s pretty dry material) but if you’ve had driveability problems or troubles with high emissions (Especially any of our California readers) this might give you the info you need!

I said it in the video and I’ll say it again here, we’re always willing to help our readers here at HondaRoots, so if you’ve got any questions, or having trouble finding information on anything, please feel free to drop us a line!

In our next video we’ll delve even deeper into the parts in charge of fuel delivery: We’ll dissect, analyze, and show you how to tune your Keihin 3 barrel carburetor. See you next time!

Ethan – Editor.

4 thoughts on “Resto File # 7: Vacuum Control Box

  • February 19, 2015 at 6:48 pm
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    Ethan, have you ever taken your car to the smog ref? My accords having some tuning issues and I’m sure it’s related to non functioning solenoids or something along those lines. Have you heard of the emissions parts locator service we have? If the ref can’t find the parts you need then exemption can be granted. I have a friend who works with CARB and I’m gathering as much info as I can to hopefully bring forward to a ref to help out all the cvcc owners who wish to run a weber without consequence. Feel free to email me too!

    Reply
    • April 3, 2015 at 3:00 am
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      Hi Michael! It’s great to hear about your efforts, I’m happy you’re doing this! I’ve always managed to get things working properly but to say some smog related parts are hard to come by would definitely be an understatement. My car has been tested with a weber on it, not for my smog test though but just to test it and see, after a little mixture adjustment it actually DID pass the sniffer test. The only thing I think may be an issue if you tried to get an E.O. # for the Weber would be the lack of a proper thermostatic air cleaner but maybe an adapter could be made to fit the factory one onto the Weber? You’d also have to integrate the charcoal cannister vent vacuum, etc… although that would be easy enough. To be truthful I think with the right setup you could actually get a weber to pass the test “honestly” and meet the current smog standards, however it would be nicer/easier to just get an exemption especially since there’s a Carb E.O. # for the weber in so many other early models like almost every Datsun EVER and several early Toyotas, etc. It’s even approved for use on some fairly rare Opel models. I look forward to hearing what sort of results you have with the ref and I hope you keep me posted. 🙂 Best of luck! ~Ethan~

      Reply
  • May 17, 2015 at 12:04 am
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    Thanks Ethan for the great video. Nice picture and good audio. I have a 1983 civic with the cvcc EM1 engine and am currently working on rebuilding it. I live in california so am concerned about passing the smog test. Luckily I have the original FSM. I bought that right after I bought the car used. Currently I have over 327K miles on the clock and want to keep it going. All those vacuum lines are a nightmare and the vacuum switches are too. The temperature actuated ones are tricky but the factory manual shows how to test them. Thanks again for the video. Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  • April 25, 2016 at 11:01 pm
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    I live in California have 82 Civic CA car that im trying to keep alive.(Very clean only 78K original miles)
    What led you to the egr valve? Car runs good when started, however when fully warmed up its missing.(i suspect egr valve)Just a bit off idle and i can feel the egr opening, also the “Secondary Air Supply System” is dumping exhaust gasses into the Carb air filter? Opposite direction than what FSM says. Thanks again for your helpful videos.

    Reply

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